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Make a life plan

1.4 Get trustworthy, up-to-date information

Choose what information you need, and in what form. Some people are happy reading on the computer, some like videos, others like printed brochures or books

Some carers want to get as much information as possible, others prefer to focus on just what they need to know right now. It is important to find current information from reliable sources. National and international dementia associations, hospitals and universities usually have accurate information.

 

Read online materials about dementia

 

Read books about dementia

  • Dementia Australia has a library of books, e-books, and pamphlets written by people with dementia, carers, researchers and health professionals. You can read some of these online, or they will loan them to you by post. Email library@dementia.org.au or call the National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500.

 

Listen to a podcast about dementia

  • The Dementia Dialogue podcast series features people with dementia and carers talking about their experiences adjusting to and living well with dementia. Check out Season 1: Mapping the Dementia Journey.

 

Talk to a dementia professional by phone

  • If you prefer to ask someone your questions rather than search online, Dementia Australia has a free, 24-hour telephone helpline 1800 100 500. The helpline advisor can post or email you information if you ask.

 

Go to an education or support group

  • Support or education groups are another way to learn more about dementia. They provide the opportunity to meet other people who are going through a similar experience. You can ask questions and discuss issues over time.
  • Some carers benefit by asking questions of other carers with significant experience. Others find going to a support group confronting when other carers talk about all stages of dementia. Some carers try a couple of different support groups to find the one they’re most suited to. Carers recommended that you keep going to meetings, even if they seem difficult at first. They describe the new friendships you make and the support you receive as invaluable.
  • Visit or call Dementia Australia for information about local face-to-face support groups and educational events.

 

 Do an online course about dementia for the public

  • Some people want more detailed information about dementia. A bonus benefit of taking a course in dementia is that learning improves brain health.
  • The University of Tasmania offers free, online 7-week courses about dementia for people living anywhere in the world. Carers, family members, friends and people with dementia find these courses helpful and enjoy completing them. The courses, known as Massive Online Open Courses or ‘MOOCS’, offer quality information and you can interact online with your lecturers and others doing the course.

 

Help the person I care for find support

  • There are support groups especially for people living with dementia. It can be helpful for the person to interact with and receive support from their peers. Dementia Alliance International (DAI) runs online peer support groups and educational webinars for members around the world. Membership is free for people with dementia.
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Ways you can learn more about dementia

  1. Read online information about dementia.
  2. Read books about dementia.
  3. Watch a video or listen to a podcast about dementia.
  4. Talk to a dementia professional on the phone: Dementia Australia Helpline 1800 100 500.
  5. Go to a support or education group.
  6. Learn from others with dementia.
  7. Do an online course about dementia.