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Finding hope

1.5 Finding hope

Life with dementia, despite the challenges, can be meaningful and even bring surprising rewards

Some doctors, while kind and compassionate, give the impression that not much can be done for dementia. Their focus is on making the diagnosis and prescribing medical treatments. They may not talk about:

  • the effects of a dementia diagnosis on family members or the person who will be the main supporter.
  • managing changes in the person you support, in your relationship and how to manage your feelings.

Following the diagnosis, many carers of people with dementia describe wanting to know “what now? ….what do I do now?”

Some carers thought there was no answer and felt hopeless. If you feel like you’ve lost hope, this website will help you find it and move forward with life with dementia.

Forward with Dementia was developed with the input of many inspirational carers. They’ve found life with dementia, despite the challenges, can be meaningful and even bring surprising rewards.

People living with dementia and carers find hope in different ways. It is helpful to talk with people who have experienced similar situations and found ways to come to terms with the diagnosis.

Some carers found hope by:

  • learning to focus on what is most important in their life.
  • working on their own health and wellbeing, rekindling old pursuits, or trying new activities to provide a sense of achievement or contentment.
  • participating in research and becoming dementia advocates.

Whether it is a conscious decision or a gradual process, finding hope in the face of dementia is key. It helps carers to live in the present but also plan for the future.

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Practice positivity

  • Write down 3 good things about your life right now and why they are important.
  • Spend time doing things and with people on your list.
  • Set regular times in your diary for things that will that boost your health and wellbeing.
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Participate in a research project

Some people enjoy ‘giving back’ by contributing to research.
Their participation might benefit themselves such as getting new treatments or it might benefit others in the future.